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How to Record Your Media Interview

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Editorial Staff
How to Record Your Media Interview

No matter what you’re doing to get media coverage, the first step is knowing how to record your media interviews. If you can’t record an interview, you won’t be able to turn it into something valuable like video content or an audio podcast. If you want to be taken seriously as an expert or brand, you need to know how to do this right!

1) Preparation

Ask if a copy of the interview will be available to you, but do not rely on it! Asking a colleague, friend, or family member to record it for you is always wise!

2) Equipment

If you’re recording the interview yourself, there are a lot of options out there. If it’s on YouTube or on a website you can use QuickTime or ScreenShot to record the screen as you play out the video. You can try downloading the video of the interviews or ask journalists to send you clips through WeTransfer. 

3) If you’re recording your own interview from home

Recording (Software/Hardware)

If you're going to be doing a lot of content, you might want to invest in good recording software and hardware. Some people like using computer-based screen capture software such as Jing or Camtasia because it allows them to do some editing afterwards (though you should also make sure your connection is as high quality as possible). Others prefer standalone digital recorders such as those made by Zoom, Tascam, or Rode. These tend to give you better audio quality, but it's more difficult (if not impossible) to edit afterwards. Whatever method you choose for recording, make sure that whatever tool you use records your voice clearly while minimizing background noise—if other people are in your room while interviewing someone on Skype or other video calling software, make sure they stay quiet while recording!

4) Post-Recording Editing & Production 

If you want to, it is helpful to use a digital audio recorder (like an Olympus Digital Voice Recorder) that allows you to digitally record your interviews and then go back and edit them at home later. Ask yourself questions like: What content should I include in my video? How much video should I make? How long should each section be? What transitions do I want? Can I incorporate any interesting visuals or sound bites from my interview footage into my finished product? After you've edited and polished your media interview footage, use a program like iMovie or Adobe Premiere Elements for more professional-looking editing with transitions, titles and music.

Here is to growing your name and brand for years to come.

- Your friends at Rolli

www.rolliapp.com


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